M.D. vs P.A.

Let’s explore the key similarities and differences between an MD and a PA – and talk about what it means for your healthcare journey.

M.D. vs P.A.

M.D. Explained

An M.D., or Doctor of Medicine, is a physician trained in allopathic medicine, a term coined in the early 19th century to differentiate homeopathy from science-based medicine. Traditionally, allopathic medical schools primarily focused training on the use of medication and surgery to treat symptoms and manage conditions. To obtain a medical degree, physicians must complete four years of medical school, undergo rigorous training and examination, and can practice in any specialty.

Although the focus of an allopathic trained physician is more disease-based and places an emphasis on medications and surgery to treat symptoms, many allopathic physicians like Dr. Stacey choose to pursue additional training that takes a more holistic approach to patient care.

P.A. Explained

A P.A., or a Physician Assistant, is a licensed clinician who is trained in general medicine but can choose to specialize in their practice. The first class of P.A.s was formed in 1965 to cover the shortage of primary care physicians. By the 1970s, the new profession had its own national certification process and medical education requirements.

While their education isn’t as extensive as an M.D., a P.A. degree still requires rigorous training. A physician assistant must graduate from an entry-level PA program then follow with a three-year PA program. During this time, an in-training PA will also be on clinical rotation for at least 12 months.

P.A.s can assist doctors during surgery, diagnose and treat patients, perform medical procedures, prescribe medications, order medical tests and interpret results, and perform other tasks alongside a licensed physician.

P.A. Explained
P.A. Explained

P.A. Explained

A P.A., or a Physician Assistant, is a licensed clinician who is trained in general medicine but can choose to specialize in their practice. The first class of P.A.s was formed in 1965 to cover the shortage of primary care physicians. By the 1970s, the new profession had its own national certification process and medical education requirements.

While their education isn’t as extensive as an M.D., a P.A. degree still requires rigorous training. A physician assistant must graduate from an entry-level PA program then follow with a three-year PA program. During this time, an in-training PA will also be on clinical rotation for at least 12 months.

P.A.s can assist doctors during surgery, diagnose and treat patients, perform medical procedures, prescribe medications, order medical tests and interpret results, and perform other tasks alongside a licensed physician.

Similarities Between M.D.s and P.A.s

Similarities Between M.D.s and P.A.s

Both M.D.s and P.A.s undergo extensive education and training to practice medicine. This includes:
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Premedical courses at university

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Graduate from degree program

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Take continuing education courses

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Maintain their certification

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Complete licensing exam

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Residency training

MDs and PAs both require licensing and certifications before they can practice. They both must also recertify every ten years. Our M.D. and P.A. are dedicated to providing you with holistic care and putting your health first.

What That Means For You

At Robinson MD, your holistic wellness comes first. Whether you are treated by Dr. Stacey, an M.D., or Jenny, a P.A., you’ll be working with a fantastic clinician who genuinely cares about your long-term health.

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